Middle-Grade · Summer Reading Mission 2017

Summer Reading Mission: Verse Novels

At the beginning of the summer, I discovered verse novels, which are novels written as a long series of free-verse poems. There aren’t a lot of these books out there, but I’ve eagerly explored the genre this summer. I’ve already written about Inside Out and Back Again, by Thannha Lai, and Heartbeat, by Sharon Creech. Here are four more that I’ve read this summer:

Love That Dog, by Sharon Creech. Unlike Heartbeat, Love That Dog is not necessarily intended to be good poetry. It’s supposed to read like a kid wrote it, and a kid who hasn’t figured out yet that breaking a sentence up over several lines does not make a free-verse poem. In this way, it’s almost more of an epistolary novel (a novel written in diary entries, letters, blog posts, etc.) than a true verse novel. We’re supposed to believe this is work a student did for English class. It’s a very sweet story, though, and the pieces come together very well, so that details that seemed random early on mean something by the end.

Blue Birds, by Caroline Starr Rose. Set in the lost Roanoak colony, this is the story of a friendship between an English girl and a Native American girl. The poetic form works very well for this story. At the beginning, the two do not even speak each other’s languages, but since it’s written in poems, the reader is able to understand what both of them are thinking and feeling.

May B., by Caroline Starr Rose. This is another one where free verse poems work better than prose possibly could. It’s a survival story, but unlike, say, The Black Stallion, it focuses on May’s emotions more than her physical struggle to survive. The poems linger on her loneliness, fear, hope, and determination in a way would seem odd in prose but flows naturally in verse.

Eva of the Farm, by Dia Calhoun. Possibly my favorite verse novel that I’ve read so far. The main character, Eva, is an imaginative and adventurous pre-teen whose family’s farm is about to be foreclosed on, and she’s determined to save it. Eva herself is a poet, and her own poems are interspersed throughout the story. As seems to be a trend in this genre, the plot matters less than the character development and emotional depth – but that’s okay, because Eva’s emotional journey is 100% worth reading.

Book Reviews · Middle-Grade

Wow. I need more books like this.

The other day, I was at Barnes and Noble and happened to pick up a book called Inside Out and Back Again, by Thanhha Lai. A 2011 Newbery Honor book, Inside Out and Back Again follows the story of a young girl whose family is forced to flee from the Vietnam War. They end up as refugees in Alabama, where the main character struggles to adjust to a new and very different life in an unfamiliar culture. It’s a powerful, moving book. But perhaps the most unusual thing about it is that it’s not written in prose: it’s a series of free-verse poems that come together to tell the story.

I didn’t expect this when I picked it up. If the back cover blurb hadn’t caught my attention first, I might have been hesitant to read any further. I do like poetry, and I write some of my own, but a whole novel-length book of poems? Who ever heard of that?

I’m glad I didn’t go with that impulse, because once I started reading, I couldn’t put it down. The poetic format didn’t make it difficult to follow at all. On the contrary, it helped it move faster and to really get into the narrator’s mindset. It’s the raw, conflicting emotions that drive the story, even more than the plot. The simplicity and power of poetry were exactly what it needed. Written in prose, I’m sure it would still have been a moving story, but it wouldn’t have packed nearly as powerful a punch.

A few Google searches later, I now know this is a genre, and that it’s called the Verse Novel. I’ll definitely be looking for more of them.