Middle-Grade · Summer Reading Mission 2017

Summer Reading Mission: Warrior Cats

The kids in my class love these books. I did, too, when I was their age. Of course, there were way fewer of them then than there are now, which makes me feel a lot older than I really am.

Anyway, as part of my summer reading project, I decided to re-read the Warriors books. Not all of them, of course – there are now 6 book series, plus various “super-editions” and graphic novels, – but just enough to get a feel for them again.

The books are about a group of feral cats living in the woods, but the characters don’t really behave like cats. They have a complex society, familial bonds, friendships, and leaders. They understand abstract concepts like loyalty and honor, they have culture and traditions, and their society is based on a set of rules that they’re all expected to follow. The adult cats train the younger ones, a few specialize in healing rather than becoming warriors, and everyone in the clan helps to care for the elderly. They’ve even learned to use basic tools, such as moss to carry water or cobwebs to bandage an open wound. In other words, they are imagined and characterized like a human society, despite not being human at all.

And yet, there’s a sort of realism that is often not present in talking animal stories. No one wears human clothes. No one can read or write. The cats sleep in the forest, hunt for their food, get into fights over territory, and face threats such as disease, wild animals, and of course, humans. Their society is human-like, but their concerns are those of cats. And this, I think, is part of why the books appeal to an older age group than most other talking animal stories. They still require a lot of suspension of disbelief, but a lot less than something like Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of Nimh.

The other big thing I noticed is that they’re coming-of-age stories. The main character of the first series starts out as a sheltered house cat, wanders off into the forest, joins one of the four Clans, and spends several books trying to prove himself before eventually becoming the Clan’s leader and uniting the forest cats against a common enemy. Future series choose to focus on new characters – always young cats trying to prove themselves – rather than continue to follow the original protagonist. This, I think, is another reason older kids seem to enjoy these books. Somewhere around 5th or 6th grade, kids’ lives become a lot more complicated very quickly: they’re going through puberty, they’re given more responsibility and freedom than before, they’re realizing that Mom and Dad can’t always fix everything, and when they go on to middle school, they have to adjust to a whole new kind of school environment and peer group. There’s a reason so many books for kids around that age are coming-of-age stories. Everything is changing for them very quickly, and they see something of their own struggles in the fictional characters’ much-more-extreme ones.

They’re also violent books, and I’d forgotten just how violent. Or maybe never noticed in the first place. In the same way that big fantasy battles featuring swords or magic wands are comfortably removed from reality, cats fighting each other doesn’t seem nearly as bad as when it’s humans doing it. And then there are forest fires, floods, diseases, winters when prey is scarce, other wild predators, cars on the highway, and dozens of other ways to get hurt. If these were books about humans instead of cats, they really wouldn’t be appropriate for ten-year-olds – and yet, I know I read them at about that age, and they didn’t bother me.

To answer the question I asked myself when I started reading, no, they’re not as good now as they seemed when I was a kid. They require a lot of suspension of disbelief, not just for the talking animals but for the supernatural aspects of the story as well, and as much as I love the fantasy genre, it was a little bit too much. The cats’ naming system (two-part names, ie. Fireheart, the first part given by the cat’s mother and the second part earned when the cat becomes a warrior) seemed awesome at the time, but now it’s just a little too complex and I’m not into it enough to keep track of all the changing names. And the basic premise just doesn’t appeal to me as much as it did then. I’ve outgrown them.

And yet, they are certainly not bad books. There’s some nostalgia there for me, but there are also worthwhile questions and themes that run through the series. What does it mean to be loyal and honorable? What does it mean to be a leader? How do we treat those who are perceived as outsiders? Is breaking the rules ever just? When should we fight, and when should we look for a peaceful solution? The series isn’t written as a moral lesson, but it explores these ideas via its feline characters.

It’s not (at least for me) the kind of series you keep coming back to your whole life, and it’s probably never going to be a children’s classic or be studied in schools. But not every book needs to be. I can understand why I liked them, despite not being a big fan of cats in real life, and I can understand why the kids at school continue to read them as more and more are released.

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