Middle-Grade · Summer Reading Mission 2017

Summer Reading Mission: Everything on a Waffle

There’s this funny thing that happens with books you read as a kid. Some of them stick with you. You somehow never outgrow them, and just keep coming back again and again to savor the familiar stories. Others fade from memory almost entirely, until years later, you find yourself face-to-face with a vaguely familiar title and think you might have an idea how it ends. You open it up, turn the first few pages, and the story feels almost new, but every now and then there’s something that triggers a memory.

That’s what Everything on a Waffle was like for me. I know I read it when I was in fifth or sixth grade. I know I enjoyed it. And I remembered the strangest things about it: the main character’s hair “the color of glazed apricots (recipe to follow)”; her insistence that sometimes you just know something, deep down, without any proof; and the unexpected flashes of wisdom amid a chaotic storyline.

  • “At heart, we’re all a pack of violent, raging wolves, but in our actions, we can be pacifists”.
  • “The only really interesting thing about someone that makes you want to explore them further is their heart”.
  • “Sometimes you get tempted to make something wonderful even better, but in doing so, you lose what was so wonderful to begin with”.

These are quotes I halfway-remembered, although I’d never have been able to tell you where they came from. And they kind of sum up why I like this book.

When I say it’s chaotic, it is. It’s got a huge cast of supporting characters, unexpected events, odd coincidences, and so many difficulties for the protagonist that it would almost have a Series of Unfortunate Events feel to it if she didn’t react with such a positive attitude. It really shouldn’t have worked – and yet, somehow, it does. And every so often, from out of the chaos – maybe even as a product of the chaos – there’s a moment that’s just so thoughtful and profound it makes you stop and think. Like a flash of lightning in a thuderstorm, lighting up the world for just a moment.

Primrose is a delightful narrator, and she tells her own story in a funny, upbeat way. She’s full of joy for life and has a unique voice that could only belong to a precocious pre-teen. The glass is always half-full in her eyes, and the narrative rewards her optimism with a happy ending. Rather than orphaned and alone, she ends up surrounded by people who care for her, from Uncle Jack to her foster parents to the owner of a restaurant who serves everything on a waffle – and, at the very end, an even happier twist that I probably shouldn’t spoil.

The book is quirky and fun, with plenty of humor and a few distinctive features, such as ending each chapter with a recipe for a food that featured in that chapter. If there’s a moral, I’d say it’s that life is what you make of it, and you can choose to dwell in self-pity or you can choose to make the most of what you’ve been given. I loved this book, and I’d definitely recommend it.

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