Middle-Grade · Summer Reading Mission 2017 · teaching literature

Summer Reading Mission

I can’t believe I’m done with my first year (or, first semester, really) of teaching. I absolutely loved it, and I’m already thinking about next year.

Probably my favorite thing about teaching is helping kids to become lifelong readers. I love working with them on the books that we read and discuss as a class, and I also love watching them explore books of their own choosing. I firmly believe that both those things are important, and that they can both be used to help nurture a love of reading – if they’re done right.

Besides that, I love the books themselves. I’ve never looked at books for kids as being silly or less worthwhile than books for adults. On the contrary, they’re just as important, if not more so. Books can help kids broaden their horizons, make sense of their world, and hone their critical thinking skills – in addition to, of course, increasing their vocabulary and becoming better readers. And books for kids often explore big questions, questions that kids really do deal with: questions like what it means to be a friend, how to adjust to major changes in life, or even what the difference is between right and wrong.

I love kids’ books. Despite being twenty-four this month, I get way more excited to find a great new children’s author I can recommend at school than a great new author of books for adults. I’ve made a huge effort since I started teaching to keep up with children’s literature, to be aware of what the kids are reading and on the lookout for good books I can recommend. And I’ve even discovered a few gems I overlooked in my own elementary school days.

This summer, I’m on a mission, and that mission actually has three parts that all kind of fit together:

Part 1: Novel Studies. I’ve been asked to keep on doing these large-group book lessons, permanently, and I couldn’t be happier. I really enjoyed it last semester, and I have all kinds of ideas for how to make it better. This summer will be my main opportunity to work on that.

Part 2: Library. The library that all 4th through 6th grade students share has way too many books crammed into a small closet-sized room. Too many books is actually a great problem to have. However, it does mean that it’s very chaotic, disorganized, and difficult to find things in there, especially since we’re a small private school with no librarian to keep things in order. It’s being moved to a bigger space this summer, and since I’ll be using the new library for my Novel Studies lessons, I’m volunteering to organize it.

Part 3: Read. This summer, I’m going to be reading as much as I can. Especially books that I know the kids are reading. I’ll probably be borrowing a lot of books from our school library, and I’ve also made a couple of visits to the local used bookstore. As much as I love children’s literature, there’s a lot that’s been written since I was a kid myself, as well as a lot that I skipped over back then, or haven’t read since I was ten. I feel that, in order to teach reading, I simply have to be in touch with what the kids are reading, and able to nudge them in the right direction when need be.

That last part is what I’ll mostly be blogging about. Every week this summer, I’ll choose a different kids’ book to read and review. I’ll talk about why I chose it, what I thought of the story, whether there’s anything in it that parents or teachers should be cautious of, and most importantly, whether I’d recommend it, and to whom.

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